Autumn charms in Mudgee’s parks and gardens

Mudgee’s public parks and gardens play a huge role in giving the town its character and attractiveness.

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They provide recreation, beautification, inspiration and information, thanks to our local Council’s gardening team.

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There are two main parks close to the town centre- Lawson Park, which runs along the banks of the Cudgegong River, and Robertson Park opposite the post office.

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This morning I was drawn by the deciduous trees in their progression from vibrant autumn foliage to the bare skeletons of winter.

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The evergreen exotics and natives provide an exquisite balance to create rich vistas of the autumn colour palette.

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Rose gardens are mulched, and calendula and violet seedlings have been planted on the Church Street roundabouts. Their winter colour will survive the heavy frosts that we know are only days or weeks away.

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In Robertson Park, near the war memorial, the rose gardens are still filled with vibrant, fragrant blooms.

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Some of the rose blossoms have been burnished by recent frosts, showing unusual, muted colours.

Around them, the interlacing grey branches of the oaks, elms and hawthorns are graced by luminous yellows and golds of the last of the autumn leaves.

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The hawthorns are almost bare, whilst the oaks are still showing traces of green amongst the abundant gold.

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People are everywhere enjoying the autumn weather. The stillness of this grey autumn day invites quiet contemplation.

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The colours glow warmly against the subdued light on this cloudy day.

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5 Comments Add yours

  1. tonytomeo says:

    Is there any autumn color outside of landscaped areas with exotic trees? Our best autumn color is from exotic trees as well. There are only a few natives that color somewhat well.

    1. My Dream Garden says:

      Hi Tony, there are only 3 truly deciduous Australian native plants- the red cedar (Toona australis) which is rare having been extensively logged in colonial times, the white cedar (Melia azedarach) and beech (Nothofagus gunnii). Except for the white cedar, these aren’t generally seen outside native forests. There are two partially deciduous native trees which are seen fairly commonly. They have excellent flower displays but don’t produce interesting autumn colour. They are the Illawarra flame tree (Brachychiton acerifolius) and the silky oak (Grevillea robusta).

      1. tonytomeo says:

        Grevillea robusta was popular here in the early 1970s. It seems to be evergreen here. Brachychiton acerifolius is rare, and also seemingly evergreen. Neither seem to bloom impressively, although the Grevillea robusta does happen to be blooming somewhat nicely north of Los Angeles presently. I am not at all familiar with the other three deciduous trees.

      2. My Dream Garden says:

        Interesting differences- maybe because the trees aren’t native to your part of the world. My post Jewels of the North from January 2019 features a stunning Brachychiton acerifolius – see https://mydreamgarden.com.au/2019/01/11/2850/. And for the lovely white cedar, see https://mydreamgarden.com.au/2017/10/25/mudgees-springtime-gardens-fragrantissima-bellissima/, posted in October 2017. Grevillea robusta here has striking orange-gold flowers and is often planted in parks and gardens alongside jacaranda which flowers at the same time (November).

      3. tonytomeo says:

        I have never seen a brachychiton bloom like THAT. they just get a few unimpressive flowers that are mostly hidden among the foliage, probably just before the old foliage gets replaced by the new. There are a few trees here that are known as cedars, but all are coniferous evergreens. The Eastern red cedar is just a juniper, but is known as cedar because it was used to make cedar chests that repel moths. It seems odd for a hardwood to get the name of cedar.

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