Kandos Gardens Fair: Great Gardens Galore

This week I’m reporting on two more great gardens from the Kandos Gardens Fair, one at Rylstone and one at Kandos. One bursting with bright flowers, the other gracefully composed with the grandeur of mature trees. Both gave me new ideas and were a pleasure to visit.

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“Ache n Back Acres”- the name will strike a chord with most dedicated gardeners. This Rylstone garden embodies a grand vision and has clearly had a great deal of hard yakka put into it over the last 12 years. This garden will be a treasure for future generations.

There’s space here for anything the gardener could desire, and the owners have made some striking statements. The water garden, built with four immense pots in a formal setting on a pale crushed granite base, captures the sense of space and elegance which the house and garden also reflect.

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There’s more crushed granite, on a pathway leading up the rise to the entrance to the house, with borders of mauve-flowered catmint, pale pink evening primrose and white standard roses.

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The owners’ love for colourful annuals is also evident, sprinkled among developing perennials of all kinds. There’s a huge diversity of plant types.

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A set of old concrete laundry tubs forms a lily pond with irises.

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Salvias are a favourite, appearing in a spectrum of pastel colours- pale apricot, pinks, lovely soft blues. Zinnias are in-your-face in technicolour, planted in dense clumps to produce the  effect of a multi-coloured bouquet.

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The beds are slightly raised, often edged or decorated with rocks, rusted household relics and silvered fallen branches, and are all well mulched.

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Westringia and African daisies, wisteria and lavender provide a hardy, drought tolerant basis for much of the garden. Mauve-pink Japanese anemones hide demurely in the shade.

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Hazelgrove at Kandos is an altogether different garden. I visited as the afternoon sun was slanting through the leaves of the hundreds of trees and shrubs. Thousands upon thousands of leaves caught and reflected the sunlight, producing a magical, dappled light effect.

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This mature, two acre garden was created from a bare block by its current owners. There’s an interesting mixture of native and exotic plants, and many artistic creations and collections scattered throughout.

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The greatest asset of this garden is the established trees at the rear of the block which tower over the parkland style garden in the back.

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I love the way the garden opens onto the sheep paddock.

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Children are planned for- enticing places to explore and play.

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Silvery-green irises look lovely against the brown mulch.

There’s a flourishing vegetable garden in a collection of old rainwater tanks.

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Vast areas attractively mulched with bark and woodchips gives a natural bushland appearance.

There are many contrasting foliage types and colours, from grey-green conifers and cypresses…

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… to delicate, pale golden ginkgo.

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Bird baths, rusted iron work and sculptures, silvery logs and branches add to the effects.

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Not afraid of bare earth, showing where the water runs, creates a natural landscape in miniature.

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There is a fascinating collection of old rusted household items displayed and used as pots for succulents. These will be shown in detail in a future blog.

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This is a most satisfying garden: relaxing, shady and designed to be enjoyed as a whole from the many vantage points dotted throughout.

Amazing gardens, amazing gardeners!

7 Comments Add yours

  1. janesmudgeegarden says:

    I visited the gardens too and loved Ache n Back Acres for its varieties of plants, some of which were unfamiliar to me, and its long views. I didn’t see Hazelgrove this year, but visited last year and really enjoyed it then. Love the garden ornaments there and all the little birds in the shrubbery! Great post, Jane.

    1. My Dream Garden says:

      Thanks very much Jane. Hazelgrove surprised me, it was a real favourite for me, despite the minimal emphasis on flowers. Jane

  2. The first photo of the sign, the sign is really wonderful! Showed it to my husband, a landscape architect, and he really loved it too.

    1. My Dream Garden says:

      Yes isn’t it delightful. The little birds are our Australian Blue Wren, so the sign looks perfect against the blue sky!

  3. tonytomeo says:

    It looks so much like California, except in the wrong season.

    1. My Dream Garden says:

      An unexpected response from you Tony- to me our part of the world is “typical Australia”- although many of the trees and flowers are, of course, introduced! Jane

      1. tonytomeo says:

        So many of your typically Australian specie were introduced here, and do very well in our climate, as well as the same exotic specie that were introduced there. I notice in pictures of Adelaide that the flora is very familiar, and very similar to what can be found around San Jose. Perth really does have much of the same flora as Los Angeles.

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