Sculptures in the garden

Does your dream garden include an expanse of perfectly trimmed, lush green lawn? Or do you loathe the very idea of the time, effort, and watering, you’d need to invest, to achieve one?

In the absence of picturesque groups of frolicking children, I don’t see much point in large expanses of lawn. That is, unless there are sculptures in the garden.

At the 2017 Sculptures in the Garden exhibition at Mudgee’s Rosby Wines, a marvellous collection of sculptures was displayed.

There was a langorous sunbather…

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Lola Loves Lounging by Emilia Krumm

some extinct animals…

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Absence of the Tasmanian Tiger by Alison Garoza

and a magnificent horse.

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Wild One by Sam Anderson

The larger sculptures were displayed on the lawns, whilst others were integrated into garden settings.

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A circle of river stones by Michael Ferris

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A charming garden adornment, artist unknown

There were farm animals made from wire netting, and a gleaming silver abstraction reaching for the sky.

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Sheep by Roshelle Mckillop

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Where’s the cork? by John Fitzmaurice

Quite a few were right at home in the garden- there were snails in the vegetable patch, chickens in the house yard, and a shark in the lily pond.

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Grace’s Nippers by Dora A Rognvaldsdottir

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The Family Slowe by Bob Teasdale

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Stealth by Maurice Berry

There were plenty of natural, and not-so-natural, flowers and plants to enjoy.

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Simple beauty of single May blossoms

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Agapanthus by the pond…or maybe not? A Field of Aggies by Jim Hamilton

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Sweet Harvest by Bob Teasdale

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Lilly by Michael Ferris

When sensory overload became too much, the gardens were there to rest the eyes and restore the balance.

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Artichokes flourishing

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Feasts and fragrance

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Ethereal lilacs

This delightful, hardworking horse was made by hardworking and talented local school students.

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And there were plenty of frolicking children!

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Judging by the huge number of visitors, everyone loves sculptures in the garden!

3 Comments Add yours

  1. tonytomeo says:

    I prefer garden sculpture in other people’s gardens. I actually appreciate it, I just do not want to live with it; like seeing art in a museum that I would not want in my own home. Saint Mary will be out there all alone.

    Like

    1. Jane says:

      Hi Tony, your point of view is thought provoking. I imagine your garden is complete in itself and without the need for objects which may distract from its natural beauty.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. tonytomeo says:

        It is a boring garden, which is funny. People expect it to be fancier because I am a horticulturist. I grow many of the same plants that I have grown continuously since I was a kid. It is also a very utilitarian garden, producing fruit, vegetables, firewood, timber, shade, dye, . . . really more than one would expect from a garden. Many of my clients have completely different gardens, that are quite spectacular. The purpose of such gardens is visual. I mean that they are there to look good, or to look inviting, or to look like ‘something’. Some of them have exquisite sculpture. Sometimes I actually envious that such gardening is not my style.

        Like

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